American History
Red Eagle



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                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Early in the 1800's the Creeks lived in towns scattered through Alabama and Georgia. Although many of them remained neutral when the War of 1812 broke out, a remarkable chief named Red Eagle did not. Red Eagle had been born William Weatherford, the son of a Scottish trader. Though only one-eighth Indian, he chose to cast his lot with the Creeks and had been deeply impressed by Tecumseh's message. ("Where today are the Pequot, the Narragansett, the Mohican and many other once powerful tribes of our people? They have vanished before the avarice and oppression of the white man, as snow before a summer sun....") Late in August of 1813 he led a war party against Fort Mims on the lower Alabama River. The fort was little more than a flimsy stockade built around the home of a man named Samuel Mims, who had given shelter to some five hundred settlers seeking refuge there from the threat of Creek attacks.

On the morning of August 30 Major John Beasley, commanding the garrison's small force of Louisiana militia, had complacently left the main gate open and neglected to post sentries. (A slave had seen painted Indians in the cornfield outside the fort. Beasley assumed it was a ploy to get out of work and had the slave flogged. Two other slaves were sent to see and reported they saw nothing.) The major paid for his confidence when, toward noon, Weatherford's men leaped out of the tall grass and came shouting toward the fort. Taken completely by surprise, the militia-men fought back as best they could, struggling for hours under the blazing sun. At last, with the house in flames from fire arrows, the defenders emerged to die at the hands of the victors, who massacred all but thirty-six who managed to escape. Beasley, probably one of the most inept commanders of all times, was killed at the gate.

When word of the slaughter reached Tennessee, the legislature there quickly authorized an army of 3,500 militia and $300,000 to suppress the Creeks and turned to a tough, profane, brawling ramrod of a man named Andrew Jackson to handle the job. Jackson was informed of the appointment on his sickbed, where he was recovering from severe wounds sustained in a duel. Though still too weak to get up, he said he would be on the march in nine days. Pale, haggard, his arm in a sling, Jackson nevertheless drove his men south at the rate of twenty miles a day. As the army approached Ten Islands on the Coosa River, Jackson learned that two hundred Creek warriors were staying in the nearby village of Tallushatchee. He sent a thousand men against the Indians, among them a rangy young frontiersman named Davy Crockett, who reported with satisfaction that "we shot them like dogs."

A note from Michael Green: Here Cowan history enters into the battle: Major Russell's battalion, with Captain John Cowan as a commander of one of the companies, his brother Robert serving under him, and Davy Crockett as one of his 3rd Sergeants; Sam Houston fought in the 39th Infantry as an Ensign; James Newberry fought in William Russell, Jr's company; James Ashley and Elisha Fyke - ancestors of my mother, Birdie Fay Ashley, fought with the mounted gunmen; Simeon Tucker - an ancestor of my father, Tom Green, fought with the Georgia volunteers; my wife, Laura Elaine Everett, would not only have the Cowans, but William Lea - an ancestor of her father, Lea Therould Everett, who served as a Sergeant in the Tennessee Mounted Gunmen.

However satisfying the victory, it did not feed Jackson's ill-supplied troops, and late in November the hungry, disgruntled soldiers started home. Jackson, still weak from his wounds and ravaged with dysentery, blocked their path and, bluffing with a rusted, useless musket, threatened to shoot the first man who stepped forward. The troops stayed, and in January of 1814 their nerveless commander had them marching south to Horseshoe Bend, where the Tallapoosa River swings in a wide loop.

Note from Michael Green: The Tennessee Mounted Gunmen that fought under General Coffee were a force that could ride great distances on the self-sustaining supplies they carried on their horses. But the men became so hungry on this campaign that William Russell, Jr. almost killed his horse for food; later, fat soaked potatoes found in the cellar of a house, where Indians were burned alive, were given to the men for food. Crockett became so disgusted with the killing, that he left just before the Battle of Horseshoe Bend and rejoined Captain Cowan at the Battle of Pensacola. Elisha Fyke was wounded in the arm and sent home after fighting in one of several small skirmishes, prior to Horseshoe Bend.

Across the neck of this peninsula, Weatherford's Creeks had built a sturdy log barricade. By the time Jackson arrived with two thousand troops, nine hundred warriors stood ready to oppose him.

Note from Michael Green: Jackson sent General Coffee to the rear to steal the Creek War Canoes and use them for a rear assault. While canon shots are fired on the front, Coffee crossed unnoticed and fired on the back of the fort; Sam Houston is wounded while scaling the wall.

Then Jackson ordered a frontal assault, and he saw his men go forward into the teeth of heavy fire and swarm across the barricade. The Indians fought stubbornly all afternoon, but by nightfall the troops virtually annihilated the Creek nation. More than five hundred warriors lay dead, but Weatherford was not among them.

A few days later a gaunt Indian, dressed in rags, appeared in the army camp and approached Jackson. "I am Bill Weatherford," he said.

Jackson took his visitor into his tent. "I am at your power," Weatherford told the general, "do with me as you please. I am a soldier. I have done the white people all the harm I could; I have fought them, and fought them bravely; if I had an army, I would yet fight, and contend to the last; but I have none; my people are all gone. I can now do no more than weep over the misfortunes of my nation."

Moved, Jackson replied, "You are not in my power. I had ordered you brought to me in chains....But you have come of your own accord....I would gladly save you and your nation, but you do not even ask to be saved. If you think you can contend against me in battle, go and head your warriors."

Weatherford walked out of the camp a free man and never fought again.

Though the Creeks would never again fight as a nation, many of them moved south to Florida, where they settled among the Seminoles, who also hated the whites. The white raids along the Florida border were all the harsher because the Seminoles had long provided santuary for runaway slaves. By December of 1817 the squabbling had grown to such a pitch that Secretary of War John C. Calhoun ordered Jackson to go back south and rectify the situation. Jackson drove straight across the border, burning every Seminole village he could find. Then taking time out from the campaign against the Indians, he seized the Spanish fort at Pensacola. With the Seminoles subdued and the Spanish in an impotent fury, Jackson headed back north. The next year Spain ceded Florida to the United States.

Note from Michael Green: Major Russell was sent to secure Pensacola. Major Russell attacked the fort at Pensacola while the city was being shelled from the sea. The city wisely surrendered; the last refuge for blacks in the South was lost. Major Russell completed his campaign by burning Seminole and Creek villages along the coast.

What happened to these men who served during the many battles of bloodshed? Red Eagle is pardoned and as William Weatherford becomes a successful plantation owner. Andrew Jackson becomes the President of the United States and has his portrait on the 20 dollar bill. Sam Houston becomes Governor of Tennessee and President and Governor of Texas. The British and Spanish lose Florida and the Indians lose 23 million acres of land. James Ashley and Simeon Tucker return to the opulence of their plantations. Elisha Fyke, a pioneer of Dallas, has a road in Carrolton, Texas named for him. William Lea becomes a founding Judge of Meigs County, Tennessee, and Newton County, Missouri. Davy Crockett is catapulted into Washington politics and dies in Texas at the Alamo. Battles that are seldom mentioned but so profound in our lives, even today.


William lived out his days as a well-to-do and well-respected planter in Monroe Co., AL.

See the story of an event that happened in his later years -- the story as told by Charles Weatherford, a grandson.

1st-Wife: Mary "Polly" Moniac

Born: about 1783 in AL;. Married: about 1797 in AL; Died in 1804, Point Tholy, in Lowndes Co., AL
Parents: William Dixon Moniac and Polly Colbert

LifeNotes: sister of Sam Moniac and half-sister to Hannah Moniac, daughter of William Dixon Moniac and Sehoy III (thus Hannah was William Weatherford's half-sister too)

Their children were:

Charles Weatherford, born 1795 Montgomery Co., AL. Married Elizabeth Ann Stiggins, daughter of George Stiggins and Elizabeth Adcock. Their children were: William Wilshire Weatherford (died young), Charles A. Weatherford (b. 1814; m. on 2/28/1861 Martha Staples at Mt. Pleasant, Monroe Co., AL with McDuff Mann as security and R. Y. Reaves as Pastor; see the letter he wrote; d. 6/13/1896, Monroe Co., AL), Elizabeth Weatherford, Lorrid L. Weatherford. Charles Weatherford died 6/13/1894, buried Weatherford Cemetery, Monroe Co., AL.
Mary "Polly" Weatherford. Died before adulthood.
2nd-Wife: Sopoth Thlanie
Born: about 1783 in AL; Married: ca 1813; Died in 1824 or immediately after birth of their son on 12/25/1813 in AL, buried Coosawda, unmarked grave
Parents: John Moniac and Mary Tyner

LifeNotes: From J. D. Driesback: she was " said to be the most beautiful forest maiden of the tribe, noted for her musical voice, and powers of song; and could charm the stern red warrior, and make him forget for the moment the war-path and the chase, by the cadence of her voice, whilst the wild bird stopped in its flight to drink in the sweet refrain."

See the dream of the Red Eagle when he saw his own end.

Their child:

William Weatherford, Jr., born 12/25/1813, AL He went west to Oklahoma with the tribe during the Removal. After Mary Stiggins died, William sued his brother Charles over the estate. Died in Tulsa, Oklahoma; see the extract from the court record.
Note: there is a notice in sources that William married Lilla Beasley, daughter of Col. Beasley of Fort Mims. The union is purported to have happened shortly after the Massacre. Am putting mention of it here because I do not want to let any item go unnoticed. Lilla's mother was the daughter of a Creek chief.

3rd-Wife: Mary Stiggins
Born: about 1783 in AL. Married in 1817 "under white law"; Died in 1832, Mount Pleasant, Monroe Co., AL, buried with other Stiggins at the Baptist Church, Little River; her wooden marker was destroyed in a brush fire.
Parents: Joseph Stiggins, an Englishman, and Nancy Grey, a Natchez, niece of Chinnabbee.

LifeNotes: sister of George Stiggins. The great Indian fighter Sam Dale was best man at the wedding of Mary Stiggins to William Weatherford.

Alexander McGillivray Weatherford. See his page. Married 1st-Martha Pollard. Their children are: Martha E. Weatherford (m. Eli King), Mary Ellen Weatherford (m. Alexander Moniac Sizemore), Percy W. Weatherford, Susan Arelia Weatherford, Frederick Tyler Weatherford, Levetia Weatherford, Charles A. Weatherford. Married 2nd-Martha "Mattie" Avery. Their son: Selestine Osceola "Oscie" Weatherford (d. 1941 Hardin Co., TX)
Mary Levitia Weatherford. See her page. Married Dr. William Forbes Howell.
Major Weatherford, who was killed as a child
Richard Weatherford

LifeNotes:

Born: ca 1685 James City Co., VA
Married; Died: ca 1755 Lunenburg Co., VA
Parents:

Wife:

LifeNotes:

Born: Married: Died:
Parents:

Their children were:

Charles Weatherford, born ca 1718 VA
William Weatherford, born VA
Martin Weatherford, born ca 1728 VA. See his page. Married 1st- Mary ?, a mixed blood. They moved about 1757 to Augusta, GA. Their son: Charles Weatherford (m. Sehoy III; father of Red Eagle--William Weatherford). Married 2nd- Isabella ?. They went to the Bahamas. Martin Weatherford died 1805.
John Weatherford, born VA
Lucy Weatherford, born VA
Elizabeth Weatherford, born VA
to Some Creek Families & Friends



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MARTIN WEATHERFORD and his wives MARY ? and ISABELLA ?

Martin Weatherford

LifeNotes: Martin and Mary moved about 1757 to Augusta, GA. After Martin married Isabella, they went to the Bahamas

Born: ca 1728 VA
Married
Parents: Richard Weatherford

Wife: Mary ?

LifeNotes: She was a mixed blood.

Born: Married: Died:
Parents:

Their children were:

James Weatherford, born ca 1750.
Charles Weatherford, born ca 1752. See his page. Married Sehoy II. Their children were: Elizabeth "Polly" Weatherford, William Weatherford,- Red Eagle, John Weatherford, Rosanna Weatherford
John Weatherford, born ca 1754
maybe Catherine Weatherford, born ca 1756. Marrieed David Douglas.
Isabella ?

LifeNotes:

Born: Married: Died:
Parents:

Their children were:

Charlotte Weatherford
Sarah Weatherford
Isabella Weatherford
William H. Weatherford
Richard Weatherford
to Some Creek Families & Friends



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CHARLES WEATHERFORD and SEHOY III

Charles Weatherford

LifeNotes: According to Dr. Marion Elisha Tarvin, Charles Weatherford "was a man of means and was a government contractor, and constructed and owned the first race courses in Alabama."

Charles Weatherford came to Creek country before 1778 with his friend Samuel Mims. He was also a longtime friend of Lachlan McGillivray.

Born: about 1752 ; Married: about 1780 in Alabama; Died
Parents: Martin Weatherford and Mary ?, a half-blood

LifeNotes: Was a trader. He was a friend of Lachlan McGillivray. He went to the Creek Nation with his friend Samuel Mims.

He lived at his horse track on the Alabama River, about 5 mile upriver from Sehoy; it was customary for Indian couples to live separately and Charles kept the custom with Sehoy. The Weatherford house was near what is now North Motgomery at Pickett Springs. There were conic mounds on the property -- 5 of which are still visible from what is now Coosada Ferry Road.

James Albert Pickett tells this story in The History of Alabama: In 1792, Creeks frequently attack homes on the Cumberland. They captured a young girl named Elizabeth Baker and brought her back to Coosawda, after murdering her family before her eyes. Across the river, Charles Weatherford heard of the girl and ransomed her back, putting her in the care of Sehoy (III), his wife.

Sehoy III

LifeNotes: Of the Wind Clan. See her page.

Born: about 1759 in Little Tulsa, Elmore, AL; 1st-union in 1774, Alabama; Married 2nd-about 1778 in Alabama; Married 3rd-about 1780; Died 1811-2 , buried in Baldwin County, Alabama; her son William Weatherford lies buried next to her.
Parents: Sehoy II and a Tuckabatchee chief

Her first husband was Colonel John Tate, a British officer with rank of colonel and the last British commander at Ft. Toulouse. The children of Sehoy II and her first husband John Tate were: David Tate, born 1778. See his family page. (m.1st-Mary Randon who died with her 2 of her daughters in the Massacre of Ft. Mims; m. 2nd- Margaret Dyer; d. 1829), John Tate II.

Their children are:

William Weatherford , or Lamochattee -- Red Eagle, born about 1781. See his family page. Married 1st-Mary Moniac, daughter of William Dixon Moniac and Polly Colbert, in 1801. Married 2nd-Sopathe Thlanie. Married 3rd- Mary Stiggins. William Weatherford died 1824.
John "Jake" David Weatherford, born about 1783 in AL. See his page. Married about 1802 in AL to Patty Dyer (b. about 1785), sister of Margaret Dyer who was the 2nd- wife of David Tate. Their children were: John D. Weatherford (m. 1st-Elizabeth Tunstall; m. 2nd- Elizabeth Waller on 6-09-1864, Monroe Co., AL, to with Johnathon English as security and A. J. Lambert as minister), Caroline Weatherford (b. about 1805; m. ? Killiam). John Weatherford assisted General Andrew Jackson during the Creek War. Given a land grant by Jackson. John and his family lived in Monroe Co., AL. and he appears on the 1854 tax list.
Rosanna Weatherford, born about 1789 in AL. See her page. Married in 1789 in Baldwin Co., AL to Captain Joseph Shomo. They lived in Monroe Co., AL. Their children were: David Tate Shomo (b. about 1809.; became a physician; m. Elizabeth Nettles Hobbs), Joseph Weatherford Shomo (b. about 1811; became a physician; m. 1st-Mary Elizabeth Wheadon; m. 2nd-Anne Tarke Moniac, widow of Dr. Alexander Moniac), James Preston Weatherford (b. about 1813), Francis William Shomo (born about 1815), Virginia Elizabeth Rosanna Shomo (b. about 1817), William Augustus Shomo (b. about 1819; m. Margaret Ione Staples), Frances Blount Shomo (b. about 1821).
Dr. Marion Elisha Tarvin, her nephew, said, "I well recollect Aunt Rosannah and Capt. Shomo, having often been at their house. She was woman of great force of of character. She was born in the upper part of Baldwin county, Ala., near where rests the remains of her warrior brother, William the 'Red Eagle".

Elizabeth Weatherford, born about 1785 in AL. Married Samuel Takkes-Hadjo Moniac about 1802 in Baldwin County, AL. See his Moniac page. Sam was born about 1781 in AL. Their children were: David Moniac (m. Polly Powell; their children were: David Alexander Moniac, sheriff of Baldwin Co., AL and d. 1880), Margaret Moniac (m. S. J. McDonald). From Dr. Marion Elisah Tarvin: "under the treaty at New York, was graduated at West Point. He was made a major and commanded 600 Creeks and Choctaws against the Seminoles in the Florida war of 1836. He was killed, 13 bullets piercing his body. A braver man never lived."), Alexander Moniac, Levitia Moniac (m.William Sizemore of Baldwin Co., AL, son of Dixon Baily's sister. William became a wealthy planter on the Alabama River. Levitia "Vicey" and William had children).
maybe Washington Weatherford, born about 1787, Baldwin Co., AL.
to Some Creek Families & Friends



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WILLIAM WEATHERFORD and his wives MARY MONIAC,
SOPATHE THLANIE, and MARY STIGGINS

William Weatherford
War name: Hopnicafutsahia -- Straight Talker or Truth Teller
Best known as Lamochattee or Red Eagle

Born: about 1781 in AL; Married 1st-about 1797 in AL; Married 2nd -about 1804 in AL; Married 3rd-about 1817 in AL; Died 3/24/1824, following a bear hunt and is buried next to his mother Sehoy III in a grave in Baldwin Co., AL
Parents: Sehoy III and Charles Weatherford

LifeNotes: Leader of the Creeks. Deemed "the architect of the Massacre at Fort Mims". See the letter his grandson Charles Weatherford, Jr. wrote about William. Nephew of Alexander McGillivray and by marriage, nephew of LeClerc Milfort; received their wisdom, according to tribal custom-- the role of the uncle was considered far more importart than that of the father.

Read about Red Eagle and the Massacre at Fort Mims!

Red Eagle goes on to full participation in the Creek War. More to come on that war. Another massacre --the Kimbell-James Massacre, the Canoe Fight with Sam Dale and his forces against the Red Sticks, the Battle of Holy Ground with Red Eagle mounted on Arrow, his black steed, the Battle of Talladega, to the climactic Battle of Horseshoe Bend where all come together -- General Andrew Jackson's forces, including Davy Crockett and Sam Houston joining with Choctaws and other tribes against the Red Sticks. This ends the war.

After the terrible defeat at Horseshoe Bend in 1814, Red Eagle goes to Ft. Jackson (formerly Ft. Toulouse), and surrendered to General Andrew Jackson. Jackson, filled with sympathy and admiration for the noble chief, takes Red Eagle home to Nashville, TN. According to Dr. Marion Elisha Tarvin, William's half brother, David Tate, (Tarvin's grandfather) was the only man in AL who knew where Weatherford was during his stay at the Hermitage.

See his speech given to General Jackson at the official surrender at Fort Jackson.

William lived out his days as a well-to-do and well-respected planter in Monroe Co., AL.

See the story of an event that happened in his later years -- the story as told by Charles Weatherford, a grandson.

1st-Wife: Mary "Polly" Moniac

Born: about 1783 in AL;. Married: about 1797 in AL; Died in 1804, Point Tholy, in Lowndes Co., AL
Parents: William Dixon Moniac and Polly Colbert

LifeNotes: sister of Sam Moniac and half-sister to Hannah Moniac, daughter of William Dixon Moniac and Sehoy III (thus Hannah was William Weatherford's half-sister too)

Their children were:

Charles Weatherford, born 1795 Montgomery Co., AL. Married Elizabeth Ann Stiggins, daughter of George Stiggins and Elizabeth Adcock. Their children were: William Wilshire Weatherford (died young), Charles A. Weatherford (b. 1814; m. on 2/28/1861 Martha Staples at Mt. Pleasant, Monroe Co., AL with McDuff Mann as security and R. Y. Reaves as Pastor; see the letter he wrote; d. 6/13/1896, Monroe Co., AL), Elizabeth Weatherford, Lorrid L. Weatherford. Charles Weatherford died 6/13/1894, buried Weatherford Cemetery, Monroe Co., AL.
Mary "Polly" Weatherford. Died before adulthood.
2nd-Wife: Sopoth Thlanie
Born: about 1783 in AL; Married: ca 1813; Died in 1824 or immediately after birth of their son on 12/25/1813 in AL, buried Coosawda, unmarked grave
Parents: John Moniac and Mary Tyner

LifeNotes: From J. D. Driesback: she was " said to be the most beautiful forest maiden of the tribe, noted for her musical voice, and powers of song; and could charm the stern red warrior, and make him forget for the moment the war-path and the chase, by the cadence of her voice, whilst the wild bird stopped in its flight to drink in the sweet refrain."

See the dream of the Red Eagle when he saw his own end.

Their child:

William Weatherford, Jr., born 12/25/1813, AL He went west to Oklahoma with the tribe during the Removal. After Mary Stiggins died, William sued his brother Charles over the estate. Died in Tulsa, Oklahoma; see the extract from the court record.
Note: there is a notice in sources that William married Lilla Beasley, daughter of Col. Beasley of Fort Mims. The union is purported to have happened shortly after the Massacre. Am putting mention of it here because I do not want to let any item go unnoticed. Lilla's mother was the daughter of a Creek chief.

3rd-Wife: Mary Stiggins
Born: about 1783 in AL. Married in 1817 "under white law"; Died in 1832, Mount Pleasant, Monroe Co., AL, buried with other Stiggins at the Baptist Church, Little River; her wooden marker was destroyed in a brush fire.
Parents: Joseph Stiggins, an Englishman, and Nancy Grey, a Natchez, niece of Chinnabbee.

LifeNotes: sister of George Stiggins. The great Indian fighter Sam Dale was best man at the wedding of Mary Stiggins to William Weatherford.

Alexander McGillivray Weatherford. See his page. Married 1st-Martha Pollard. Their children are: Martha E. Weatherford (m. Eli King), Mary Ellen Weatherford (m. Alexander Moniac Sizemore), Percy W. Weatherford, Susan Arelia Weatherford, Frederick Tyler Weatherford, Levetia Weatherford, Charles A. Weatherford. Married 2nd-Martha "Mattie" Avery. Their son: Selestine Osceola "Oscie" Weatherford (d. 1941 Hardin Co., TX)
Mary Levitia Weatherford. See her page. Married Dr. William Forbes Howell.
Major Weatherford, who was killed as a child
John Weatherford, died as a child.
Woodrow Wallace shares the story of the Red Eagle's demise from Dreisback: The Red Eagle goes on a hunting trip and seeing the white deer among all the brown ones and reads therein his own death, going home from the hunt and dying three days later dreaming of departing hand in hand with Sopoth Thlanie.

to Some Creek Families & Friends



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JOHN "JAKE" DAVID WEATHERFORD and PATTY DYER

John "Jake" David Weatherford

LifeNotes: John Weatherford operated the Claiborne ferry. He was able to assist General Andrew Jackson during the Creek War by helping Jackson transport the Army across the Alabama River. John was given a land grant by James Monroe for his service; the grant included a large portion of Monroe County and the adjoining counties. John and his family lived in Monroe Co., AL. and he appears on the 1854 tax list.

Born: about 1783 in AL; Married:a bout 1802 in AL; Died:
Parents: Charles Weatherford and Sehoy III

Patty Dyer

LifeNotes: She was sister of Margaret Dyer who was one of the wives of David Tate.

Born: about 1785; Married: ; Died:
Parents:

Their children were:

John D. Weatherford. Married his cousin 1st-Elizabeth Tunstall, daughter of Louisa Matilda Mary Tate and George Tunstall; Dr. Marion Elisha Tarvin was at the wedding "which was a brilliant affair". Their children: Rosa Weatherford (married and went to Indian Territory near Oklahoma), Fanny Weatherford (married twice; lived near Hiuntsville, AL in a community named Gurley; died in Gurley), Married on 6-09-1864, Monroe Co., AL, to 2nd- Elizabeth Waller with Johnathon English as security and A. J. Lambert as minister. Their children were: William Weatherford (died young), Thomas Waller Weatherford, Sr. (b. 7/25/1865; m. Rosa Shomo; they had 12 children; d. 1/18/1941)
Caroline Weatherford, born about 1805. Married ? Killiam. Their descendants lived around Flomaton and Century, FL.
to Some Creek Families & Friends



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ROSANNA WEATHERFORD and JOSEPH SHOMO

Rosanna Weatherford

LifeNotes: When young, Rosanna attended local schools. When she turned 16, her uncle David Tate took her to Raleigh, NC, to attend school; where she stayed there 2 years.

Rosanna and Joseph and their children lived in Monroe Co., AL.

Dr. Marion Elisha Tarvin, her nephew, said, "I well recollect Aunt Rosannah and Capt. Shomo, having often been at their house. She was woman of great force of of character. She was born in the upper part of Baldwin county, Ala., near where rests the remains of her warrior brother, William the 'Red Eagle".

Born: about 1789 in Baldwin Co., AL Married: 12/25/1821; Died: buried in the family cemetery near the home of her son William A. Shomo.
Parents: Charles Weatherford and Sehoy III

Captain Joseph Shomo

LifeNotes: He was an officer in the US Army. Resigned on 12/31/1820. Bought a farm in Clarke County, AL. They lived, however, in Monroe County, AL, at Mt. Pleasant. He was an Odd Fellow, a Democrat and a Methodist. His last residence is shown as Penscaola, FL.

Born: Married: 12/25/1821; Died: buried at Fort Barrancas.
Parents:

Their children were:

David Tate Shomo, born 5/16/1824. Became a physician. Married Elizabeth Nettles Hobbs. Died 10/25/1854.
Joseph Weatherford Shomo, born about 1811; became a physician. Married 1st-Mary Elizabeth Wheadon. Married 2nd-Anne Tarke Moniac, widow of Dr. Alexander Moniac.
James Preston Weatherford, born about 1813. Died young.
Francis William Shomo, born about 1815
Virginia Elizabeth Rosanna Shomo, born about 1817
William Augustus Shomo, born about 1819. Married Margaret Ione Staples. Their daughter: Rosa Shomo (m. T. W. Weatherford, Sr.).
Frances Blount Shomo, born about 1821.
to Some Creek Families & Friends



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ELIZABETH WEATHERFORD and SAMUEL TAKKES-HADJO MONIAC

Elizabeth Weatherford

LifeNotes:

Born: about 1785 in AL; Married: about 1802 in Baldwin County, AL; Died:
Parents: Charles Weatherford and Sehoy III

Samuel Takkes-Hadjo Moniac

LifeNotes: See his Moniac page

Born: about 1781 in AL; Married: about 1802 in Baldwin County, AL; Died:
Parents: William Dixon Moniac, see his Moniac page, and Polly Colbert

Their children were:

David Moniac. Married Margaret "Polly" Powell. Their children were: David Alexander Moniac (sheriff of Baldwin Co., AL and d. 1880), Margaret Moniac (m. S. J. McDonald).
From Dr. Marion Elisah Tarvin: "under the treaty at New York, was graduated at West Point. He was made a major and commanded 600 Creeks and Choctaws against the Seminoles in the Florida war of 1836. He was killed, 13 bullets piercing his body. A braver man never lived.").

Another account from J. D. Driesback: "... of whom Gen. Jessup said, that he was as brave and gallant a man as ever drew a sword or faced an enemy. ... His wife was a cousin of Osceola, the Florida chief, who commanded the Florida Indians when Maj. Moniac was killed. Moniac had resigned his commission in the U. S. A. many years before the Florida war of 1836, and entered the army as a private in the company from Claiborne, Ala., but soon rose to the rank of Major by Brevet, and was in command of 600 Creeks and Choctaws when he was killed." (Alabama Historical Reporter, Vol. 2, No. 4, March 1884) See this piece in its entirety.

Alexander Dixon Moniac. See his page. Married Elizabeth Ehlert.
Levitia Moniac. Married William Sizemore of Baldwin Co., AL, son of Dixon Baily's sister, Mary Bailey and William Arthur Sizemore. William became a wealthy planter on the Alabama River. Levitia "Vicey" and William had children.
to Some Creek Families & Friends



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ALEXANDER McGILLIVRAY WEATHERFORD and his wives MARTHA POLLARD, JANE HADLEY, and MARTHA "MATTIE" AVERY

Information with many thanks to descendant Jim Guest

Alexander McGillivray Weatherford

LifeNotes:

Frances Eldorado Holland, second wife of Alexander's son "Oscie" Weatherford, in a letter dated 1 April 1975 to her grandson James Guest, stated, "Selestine Oscie Weatherford was born June 1, 1866 in Mobile, Alabama. His parents were Alexander McGillivray Weatherford and Mattie Avery. He came to Texas in 1874."

Alexander (Alex) took his family to Austin County Texas in 1874, and some years later went back to Alabama (to sell some land, according to family stories) and died there.

Alexander is shown in the 1880 census of Austin County Texas as being 61 years old. His child Maude is shown to be 3 years old and born in Alabama, and his son John shows to be 4 months old and born in Texas. This means that Alex's wife Martha "Mattie" (and probably the whole family) would have been in Alabama in about 1876, but in Texas by 1880.

Alexander's granddaughter, Ina Weatherford Toups said that her grandfather, "Alex" Weatherford, came to Texas with his family from around Mobile, Alabama in the 1870's, and that he had "owned slaves". (The 1880 U.S. Census of Austin County Texas shows a black family living in the same "dwelling" with Alexander and his family. The father in the black family is listed as a "servant".)

Ina said that she was told that Alexander went back to Alabama after some years, evidently to sell some land he had there. She said that she didn't think he came back to Texas because the family story was that, "the old man died in Alabama", and that, the land was never sold".

The 1860 US Census of Baldwin County Alabama shows Alexander's age as 40. (From the 1860 U.S. Census of Baldwin County, Alabama. Dwelling 335, Line 5.)

The 1870 U.S. Census of Escambia Co., AL shows Alleck's age as 55. He is listed as an "Indian", born in Alabama, and his occupation is listed as "rail road laborer". His wife Martha's age is listed as 29, as "white", and as a housewife, also born in Alabama. They have four boys, but evidently declined to answer any more questions because the census taker made a notation stating that Alexander had " 4 boys whom he refused to give names....ages". Another notation in different hand writing states "Weatherford refused to answer any questions regarding his children". (from the 1870 U.S. Census of Escambia County, Alabama. 4 July 1870, Jack's Spring Beat, Pg 188, Family #27.)

The 1880 US Census of Austin County Texas shows Alexander's age as 61, his occupation as a farmer, and states that he and his parents were born in Alabama. His wife Martha, 35, is also listed, and seven children, Willie 18, Walter 16, Oceola 13, Agustus 11, Leslie 6, Maud 3, and John 4 months. (from the 1880 U.S. Census of Austin County, Texas. 8 June 1880, ED 166, Pg 4, lines 29. and 30)

The book on William Weatherford by Lynn Hastie Thompson, gives something about Alexander's life before he brought his family to Texas. She says that he "served as Justice of the Peace in and for Baldwin Co. Alabama in September of 1856". Also that during the Civil War of 1861 to 1865 that, "Alexander served in Capt. T.C. English's company of Confederate mounted infantry."

The book also states about Alexander that, "In his later years he lived in Austin, Texas, but his last years he lived with Mary Sizemore, his daughter, in South Monroe County, Alabama."

Born: abt 1820, Alabama; Married 1st-; Married 2nd- : Married 3rd: 14 Mar 1860, Baldwin Co., AL; Died: about 1897 at age 77, while visiting in AL.
Parents: William Weatherford The Red Eagle and Mary Stiggins

1st-Wife: Martha Pollard

LifeNotes:

Born: Married: Died:
Parents:

Their children were:

Martha E. Weatherford. Married Eli King
Mary Ellen Weatherford. Married Alexander Moniac Sizemore.
Percy W. Weatherford, born about 1847
Susan Arelia Weatherford, born about 1849.
Frederick Tyler Weatherford, born about 1851. He went to the city of Austin, TX.
Levetia Eulalia "Tuba" Weatherford, born about 1854.
Charles A. Weatherford, born about 1857.
2nd-Wife: Jane Hadley

LifeNotes:

Born: Married: Died:
Parents:

Their child:

Mary Weatherford, born about 1843.
Wife: Martha "Mattie" Avery

LifeNotes:

Born: Married: 14 Mar 1860 at age 40, Baldwin Co., AL; Died:
Parents:

Their son:

Willis "Will" Weatherford, born 1862. Died about 1906)
Walter McGillivray Weatherford, born bet 1 Jun 1862 and 1864. Died about 3 Jul 1924.
Selestine Osceola "Oscie" Weatherford, born 1866 in Monroe Co., AL (or Mobile Co., AL). Married 1st- ?. Married 2nd-Frances Eldorado Holland, daughter of James K. Polk Holland and Letha Ann Evans from Hardin Co., TX. One daughter was: Ina Leona Weatherford (b. 8 Oct 1908, Village Mills, Hardin Co., TX). Died 1941 Hardin Co., TX, buried there.
Leslie "Lel" McGillivray Weatherford, born 18 Jun 1872 . Died 7 Oct 1936.
Clyde Weatherford, born abt 1873. Died about 1950.
D. G. "Gus" Weatherford, born Dec 1875. Died about 1925.
Maude Weatherford, born abt 1877, AL.
Verna Weatherford, born about 1878. Died about 1915.
John Weatherford, born about 1880, TX.
Jim Guest also lists sources: "Red Eagle and the Wars with the Creek Indians of Alabama" (George Cary Eggleston 1839-1911, Dodd, Mead & Co., New York, published reprint of 1878 edition and also on LDS microfiche #6088297), "William Weatherford, His Country and His People" Lynn Hastie Thompson, Lavender Publishing, Company, P.O. Box 884, Bay Minette, AL36507, published 1991), "Early Alabama Marriages" (published by Family Adventures, PO Box 290354, San Antonio, TX. 78280-1754. Pg 12)

to Some Creek Families & Friends



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MARY LEVITIA WEATHERFORD AND DR. WILLIAM FORBES HOWELL

George Windes is a descendant of Mary Levitia and William Howell and would like to hear from you if you share lines or if you have information on the Howells. George offers us the information below.

Mary Levitia or Levelita Weatherford

LifeNotes: She was very young when her father died. She was the only daughter of William Weatherford to grow to adulthood.

Mary Levitia and her Dr. Howell would stay in Alabama till 1850, when her mother's estate was settled, and then moved with several children and numerous slaves to Louisiana where the family had holdings in Natchitoches, DeSoto and Sabine Parishes. Sadly, there was much sickness along the bayou's, and Levitia died at age 36 in 1859.

Born: 1823, Little River, AL. Shown as age 24 in the 1850 census.
Married: 4/11/1842, Monroe Co., AL, C. C. Sellers, surety, T. Burpo, Ordained Minister (source: "Monroe and Conecuh County, Alabama Marriages 1833-1880", Dr. Lucy Wiggins Colson, P. D. and Dr. Robert Ellis Colson, Southern Historical Press, 1983)
Died: in 1859; is buried in a lonely, unkept forest place (Campground Cemetery) near Pleasant Hill, Louisiana. Two of her children are beside her, Bonaparte, age 5, and Natalie, age 14. The widower put up a nine foot apex style monument, which has fallen at least once.
Parents: William Weatherford "Red Eagle" and Mary Stiggins

Dr. William Forbes Howell

LifeNotes: Was from Wilcox Co., AL. He married 2nd- Louisa Elizabeth Smith Durr, widow, about 1860. They had a daughter Emily Hall Howell, born 1862, after Dr. Howell died.

Born: AL; Married: 4/11/1842, Monroe Co., AL, C. C. Sellers, surety, T. Burpo, Ordained Minister -- William is shown as William Harwell (source: "Monroe and Conecuh County, Alabama Marriages 1833-1880", Dr. Lucy Wiggins Colson, P. D. and Dr. Robert Ellis Colson, Southern Historical Press, 1983); Died:
Parents: William H. Howell and Lucy Williamson. William H. Howell was a successful Alabama planter.

Their children were:

Theodicia Howell, born 1843 AL. Shown as age 7 in the 1850 census.
Natalie Weatherford, born 1844 AL. Shown as age 5 in 1850 census. Died 1859, and buried next to her mother at Camp Ground Cemetery.
Lamar Howell, born 1846. AL Shown as age 3 in the 1850 census. Fought for the Confederacy. Later lived in DeSoto Parish, Louisiana.
BonaparteWeatherford, born 1846 AL. Shown as age 4 in the 1850 census. Died 1852, buried near his mother, Camp Ground Cemetery.
Winfield Scott Howell, born 1850 AL. Shown as age 6 moths in the 1850 census.
Josephine Elizabeth Howell, born 1852, LA, the first of the Howell children born after the move to Louisiana. Married Lloyd C. Freeman. Their children were: Joseph Leroy Freeman (b. 12/14/1873 Pleasant Hill, LA; m. on 3/24/1907 to Dona Elizabeth Baker, daughter of Columbus Winfield Baker and Francis Brooks), Theodore Freeman (m. Rosanna Harjo, daughter of Hepsey Harjo and Woxie Harjo), Carlyle Freeman (b. 1876; m. Louvinia Harjo, daughter of Hepsey Harjo and Woxie Harjo; d. 1886), Lynne S. Freeman (d. young), Estelle Freeman (m. Columbus Winfield Baker, son of Thomas Baker-- and father of Dona Elizabeth Baker), Ella Blanche Freeman, Mamie Freeman, Emma Freeman (m. Joe Barnwell), Lloyd Freeman (d. young). This is Anita Freeman Cox's line through Carlyle Freeman.
William Howell, born 1855.
Marot "Morottie" Howell, born 1862.
to Some Creek Families & Friends



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CHARLES WEATHERFORD and ELIZABETH "BETSY" ANN STIGGINS

Charles Weatherford

LifeNotes: He and Elizabeth lived at the old homeplace of his father.

Born: 1795 in what is now Montgomery Co., AL; Married: Died: 6/13/1894 Monroe Co., AL
Parents: William Weatherford and Mary Moniac

Elizabeth Stiggins

LifeNotes:

Born: ca 1806; Married: ; Died:
Parents: George Stiggins and Elizabeth Adcock

Their children were:

William Wilshire Weatherford, born ca 1829. Died young.
Captain Charles A. Weatherford, born 6/4/1834 Monroe Co., AL. Married on 2/28/1861 Martha Virginia Staples (b. ca 1837; d. ca 1913, Baldwin Co., AL, daughter of Jason Staples and Margaret Powell, at Mt. Pleasant, Monroe Co., AL with McDuff Mann as security and R. Y. Reaves as Pastor. See the letter Charles wrote. Their children were: Sherman Evans Weatherford (b. 1 Dec 1862; m. Ruby V. (Ukn) who was born ca 1882; d. 9 Dec 1926), Sidney Clay Weatherford, Margaret "Maggie" James Weatherford (m. Charles Sizemore), Mary "Mamie" Staples Weatherford, Laura McGillivray Weatherford, Martha Marcelline or Marcellitte Weatherford (m. ? Deaux), Charles Jason Weatherford, Willliam "Billy" Weatherford, Charles Jason Weatherford II (b. ca 1870), Ione Zaydee Weatherford. Died 9/13/1909 or 6/13/1896, Monroe Co., AL, buried in Weatherford Cemetery, Monroe Co., AL.
Elizabeth Weatherford, born ca 1834-5. Died 4/1850 of a fever
Lorrid L. Weatherford, born ca 1841
to Some Creek Families & Friends



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CAPTAIN CHARLES A. WEATHERFORD and MARTHA VIRGINIA STAPLES

Captain Charles A. Weatherford

LifeNotes: See the letter Charles wrote

Born: 6/4/1834 Monroe Co., AL
Married: on 2/28/1861, at Mt. Pleasant, Monroe Co., AL with McDuff Mann as security and R. Y. Reaves as Pastor.
Died: 9/13/1909 or 6/13/1896, Monroe Co., AL, buried in Weatherford Cemetery, Monroe Co., AL.
Parents: Charles Weatherford and Elizabeth "Betsy" Ann Stiggins

Martha Virginia Staples

LifeNotes:

Born: ca 1837
Married: on 2/28/1861, at Mt. Pleasant, Monroe Co., AL with McDuff Mann as security and R. Y. Reaves as Pastor.
Died: ca 1913, Baldwin Co., AL
Parents: Jason Staples and Margaret Powell

Their children were:

Sherman Evans Weatherford, born 1 Dec 1862. Married Ruby V. (Ukn) who was born ca 1882. Their children were: Estelle Weatherford (b. 1900), David M. Weatherford (b. 1902), Ruby Weatherford (b. 1903), Laura Weatherford (b. 1904), Arthur Weatherford (b. 1906), Eunice Weatherford (b. 1903), Mamie Weatherford (b. 1909),. Sherman Evans Weatherford died 9 Dec 1926
Sidney Clay Weatherford
Margaret "Maggie" James Weatherford. Married Charles Sizemore.
Mary "Mamie" Staples Weatherford
Laura McGillivray Weatherford
Martha Marcelline or Marcellitte Weatherford (m. ? Deaux
Charles Jason Weatherford
Willliam "Billy" Weatherford
Charles Jason Weatherford II, born ca 1870. Married Susan C. (Ukn) who was born ca 1883. Their child: Oscar H. Weatherford (b. 1908)
Ione Zaydee Weatherford.


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DANIEL T. WEATHERFORD and his wives

Daniel Weatherford

Born 10/12/1812 SC

1st-wife: Sarah (?).

LifeNotes: They were in Walton Co., FL in 1850 for the census; Daniel is shown there as age 37 and Sarah is shown age 36 and born in AL. Later Daniel is shown in Neshoba Co., MS in the 1860 census as age 45. and in the 1870 census there as age 60. He is shown in the Angelina Co., TX 1880 census as age 67. He dies 9/29/1895. Suzanne Sowell asks your help for more information on Daniel and his family. Daniel is not shown in any way connected to the Creek Weatherford. If you know anything, please email Suzanne Sowell.

Their known children are:

Benjamin Weatherford. He is listed as age 17 and born in AL in the 1850 census for Walton Co., FL.
John Weatherford. He is listed as age 8 and born in AL in the 1850 census for Walton Co., FL and age 18 iand born in AL n the 1860 census for Neshoba co., MS.
William Weatherford. He is listed as age 7 and born in AL in the 1850 census for Walton Co., FL and as age 16 and born in AL in the 1860 census for Neshoba Co., MS.
Sarah Weatherford. She is listed as age 5 and born in AL in the 1850 census for Walton Co., FL.
George Weatherford. He is listed as age 2 and born in AL in the 1850 census for Walton Co., FL and the 1860 census for Neshoba Co., MS as age 11 and born in FL.
Elizabeth Weatherford. She is listed as age 14 and born in AL in the 1860 census for Neshoba Co., MS and as age 20 in the 1870 census for Neshoba Co., MS.
Caroline E. Weatherford. She is listed as age 8 and born in FL in the 1860 census for Neshoba Co., MS.
Charles M. Weatherford. He is listed as age 6 and born in FL in the 1860 census for Neshoba Co., MS.
In 1860, Daniel is in Neshoba Co., MS with no wife but with these children from the above list: William, Elizabeth, George, Caroline E., and Charles M.

Mary Webb

Born, Married by 1870, Died
Parents:

Mary is shown in the 1879 census in Neshoba Co., MS as age 25 and born supposedly in MS; she is shown in the Angelina Co., TX 1880 census as age 37.

Their children are:

Victoria Weatherford. She is listed as age 9 and born in MS in the 1870 census for Neshoba Co., MS.
Zacharia Weatherford. He is listed as age 3 and born in MS in the 1870 census for Neshoba Co., MS.
Henry James. He is listed as age 1 and born in MS in the 1880 census for Neshoba Co., MS. He is shown in the Angelina Co., TX 1880 census as age 11.
Zacharia Weatherford. He is listed in the 1880 census for Neshoba Co., MS. He is shown in the Angelina Co., TX 1880 census as age 13.
Walton Weatherford. He is listed in the 1880 census for Neshoba Co., MS. He is shown in the Angelina Co., TX 1880 census as age 9.
David Weatherford. He is shown in the Angelina Co., TX 1880 census as age 7.
Mary L. Weatherford. She is shown in the Angelina Co., TX 1880 census as age 4
Josie Weatherford. She is listed n the Angelina Co., TX 1880 census as age 2.
to Some Creek Families & Friends



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Head stone of renown Creek Indian Chief, William "Red Eagle" Weatherford.
Historical information sign of Sehoy III and her son, William "Red Eagle" Weatherford.After the war, William Weatherford became a permanent citizen of the lower part of the county of Monroe County, Alabama, where, upon a good farm, well supplied with negroes, he lived, maintained an excellent character, and was much respected by the American citizens for his bravery, honor and strong native sense. [2]

Sometime in February 1824, Weatherford reportedly made a strange prophecy [citation needed]: He was one of a party hunting deer and bear on Lovett's Creek when an albino deer was killed. Weatherford told the others that someone of the party would soon be called to the hunting ground of the spirit land and that the white deer was a "token". Weatherford left the hunt and immediately returned home. Within a few days, he became severely ill and died shortly afterwards.





 

William "Red Eagle" Weatherford, (1780 – March 24, 1824), was a Creek (Muscogee) Indian who led the Creek War offensive against the United States. William Weatherford like many of the high-ranking members of the Creek nation, was half Scottish and half Creek Indian. His father was Charles Weatherford, a Scottish trader and his mother was Sehoy, Princess of the prestigious Wind Clan.

William Weatherford was a Nephew of Alexander McGillivray [1], and by marriage, the nephew of Le Clerc Milfort; according to tribal custom the uncle was considered far more important than that of the father, he received their wisdom accordingly. William Weatherford was also a cousin of William McIntosh.

William Weatherford is usually considered to be the architect of the Fort Mims Massacre. However, there is some disagreement on this point. One account indicates that he tried to stop the massacre after the fort was captured, but was unable to do so. His grandson maintains that Weatherford was opposed to the attack because some of his own relatives had taken refuge in the stockade.


Sehoy III and Red Eagle graves in the distance with information sign in foreground.
This symbol is located near Sehoy III and Chief Red Eagle's graves.Besides the "massacre at Fort Mims", Red Eagle (is thought to have) participated in the Canoe fight with Sam Dale of the Alabama Militia, the Battle at the Holy Ground (where he escaped capture on Arrow), Talladega, and (some believe) the climactic Battle of Horseshoe Bend.

William Weatherford (some believe) was among the 200 or so Red Sticks who escaped after the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. However, he did not flee to Florida, but voluntarily turned himself in at Fort Jackson (formerly Fort Toulouse), where he impressed Andrew Jackson with his surrender speech. Jackson wisely spared Weatherford and used him to bring the other Upper Creek to the Peace conference.

It is generally agreed that William Weatherford visited with Andrew Jackson at The Hermitage, but accounts differ as to the exact circumstances. One version states that Jackson took him there after the war to protect him from his enemies among the Creek people as well as the settlers in the area. Another version says that William Weatherford visited The Hermitage in later years.


Head stone of renown Creek Indian Chief, William "Red Eagle" Weatherford.
Historical information sign of Sehoy III and her son, William "Red Eagle" Weatherford.After the war, William Weatherford became a permanent citizen of the lower part of the county of Monroe County, Alabama, where, upon a good farm, well supplied with negroes, he lived, maintained an excellent character, and was much respected by the American citizens for his bravery, honor and strong native sense. [2]

Sometime in February 1824, Weatherford reportedly made a strange prophecy [citation needed]: He was one of a party hunting deer and bear on Lovett's Creek when an albino deer was killed. Weatherford told the others that someone of the party would soon be called to the hunting ground of the spirit land and that the white deer was a "token". Weatherford left the hunt and immediately returned home. Within a few days, he became severely ill and died shortly afterwards.




posted by The Passenger on Tuesday, October 2, 2007 - link to this photo

1 Comment 

gina

126 Wed, January 2, 2008 - 8:33 PM
family history there, how fortunate to know, I think my Irish relatives were nothing more than those who survived the pototoe famine
       more photos in WARTIME
          
          


« My Numeriacal Reading | main | Reading By Tam »
Chief Red Eagle(My Grandfather)    Fri, February 15, 2008 - 6:32 PM

Red Eagle/ a seldom told story
(This is just one of many books about The Grand Chief Red Eagle My grandfather)


Have you ever seen a pictue of an Indian sitting of a horse
On a cliff with his hands raised to the sky (often called, end of the trail)
Well it is supposedly depicting Geronamo. However it was first meant to express the story of the Massacure of Fort Mims. (in Alabama)(see websters Under AFort Mims)
My great great(4x) grand-father was William Weather ford (chief Red Eagle, of the creek nation) He was half Scottish and half Creek Indian. Another famous picture can be found in the “A” section for Alabama fort mims in Websters Dictionary, Of Red Eagle Smoking a peace pipe with Andrew Jackson.
His father was a Scottish fur trader who fell in love with a Creek wind clan princess. He married her and became a Creek Indian himself.
The Creeks were the people of all the South as far north as North Mississippi and Alabama and Georgia . As far west as New Orleans. And as far to the east as florida They were cousins to the seminole
WILLIAM WEATHERFORD and his wives MARY MONIAC,
SOPATHE THLANIE, and MARY STIGGINS

William Weatherford
War name: Hopnicafutsahia -- Straight Talker or Truth Teller
Best known as Lamochattee or Red Eagle

Born: about 1781 in AL; Married 1st-about 1797 in AL; Married 2nd -about 1804 in AL; Married 3rd-about 1817 in AL; Died 3/24/1824, following a bear hunt and is buried next to his mother Sehoy III in a grave in Baldwin Co., AL
Parents: Sehoy III and Charles Weatherford

LifeNotes: Leader of the Creeks. Deemed "the architect of the Massacre at Fort Mims". See the letter his grandson Charles Weatherford, Jr. wrote about William. Nephew of Alexander McGillivray and by marriage, nephew of LeClerc Milfort; received their wisdom, according to tribal custom-- the role of the uncle was considered far more

I am also a great-great-great-great granddaughter of Chief Red Eagle. This may be upsetting, but it's been my family's oral history that Chief Red Eagle faked his death and went on to live a new life in Tennessee. We have our family history. It's always been intact. I have newspaper articles from the 1950s that cite this information. Is there anyway to verify one way or another? I am interested in connecting with my Creek family.

Correction
Sorry, I'm the great-great-great granddaughter of Chief Red Eagle. Our family's oral history/tradition tells of him moving up into the Hardin County, Tennessee area after faking his own death. I have a picture of my great-great grandmother's grave (his daughter). His identity was kept very secret, (except for his direct desendatnts. as he didn't want his new life disrupted
After the war, Weatherford became a citizen of the lower part of Monroe County, Alabama, where he became a wealthy planter. He died there in 1824